Scenery: July 2010 Archives

Zion National Park's Top Hikelights

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riversideblog.jpgRiverside Walk Trail

deerzion.jpgWe went on a two mile hike, Riverside Walk.It starts by going down a paved stairway into a canyon. We saw an "amateur arch," an arch which hadn't yet been fully formed. It was part of a hanging garden, which was surprisingly lush for the desert. We also saw a family of deer. They were eating and weepwallzion.jpglicking a rock for the salt. Later on the family came out and walked alongside the trail for a while, then went back to the woods. There are nice views of the Virgin River alongside the walk, and some towering rocks leading to the walls of this canyon. The trail ends where the river takes up the whole of the canyon floor, but you can still go on to a place called The Narrows. This is a less populated hike, as there is barely a trail, but it is still one of Zion's top attractions.

Weeping Wall, Zion Nat'l Park    

    Weeping Wall (or Weeping Rock) is a short, paved hike, only 0.5 miles roundtrip. It goes up to a wall where water drips down. The water is 2000-4000 years old, as it has to seep down through sedimentary layers of shale. The water still drips quickly, despite that. We chose people where our water came from (Mikaela was the Egyptian pharaoh, Khufu, and I was Julius Caesar [I said he splashed Augustus with it].)

Emerald Pools

The Emerald Pools are very nice if you go in the fall. The trail is filled with ruts and small waterfalls trickle quietly across the trails, but the leaves on the trees are filled with fall color, making the hike to the bright blue-green lake waters very pretty.

Who's hiding in the fall foliage?


Viewpoints and Scenic Drives


The Zion-Mt Carmel Highway's famous 

Checkerboard Mesa is a stop recommended 

by several travel websites and magazines, but its eroded chessboard pattern is not as remarkable 

patriarch1.jpg

as many travel episodes show it to be. However, it is a nice stop (and don't forget to bring some checkers: they make a good picture).


Another good stop is the "three patriarchs," Isaac, Abraham, and Jacob. However, Mt Isaac's name cannot be fully attributed to the Biblical character: the man who gave these three mountains their names happened to be called Isaac, too. A clever way to name something after yourself without bluntly stating it?


BP Oil Spill Response: Testing The Cap

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The BP oil cap may not work due to pressure, as the rubber seal already has 600 atmospheres of pressure on it. In the case that the pressure is too great, the well could leak for years. Then we would face the considerable problem of the oil pumping out of the earth faster than our planet could take it back in. In that case, as happens with water and other liquids pumped out from under the surface, a large sinkhole would form.

Also the whole Gulf ecosystem, especially marshes such as the Everglades, are likely to be wiped out. Recently iNational Geographic I read a study about oil being buried under seemingly white and glistening beaches as a result of extensive overturning of the sand to clean the beaches. That could be a danger to crabs and other fauna under the sands.  Numerous bird species have already been affected, and it is anticipated that many more will become extinct if the oil well is not capped properly. 

About this Archive

This page is a archive of entries in the Scenery category from July 2010.

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