Jaz Brisack: April 2011 Archives

Variations On Banana Bread

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These recipes have been adapted from the original, previously posted, banana nut muffin recipe. All of them work at high or low altitudes and are very adaptable, so experimenting is easy.

Carrot Cake
carrotcropped.jpg2 cups flour
1 ½ tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1 cup sugar
¼ cup oil
1 ripe mashed banana
¼ cup water
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup cut carrots
Approximately 1 cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 365 degrees. Mix flour, baking soda, salt and cinnamon together in one bowl; whisk sugar and oil in another bowl. Stir the sugar mix thoroughly with mashed bananas, water and vanilla. Add dry ingredients, carrots and pecans, adding water if necessary. Pour into greased pan or muffin cups. Cook muffins for 26 minutes. Cakes, depending on the size of the pan, generally take longer, but they're done when a toothpick comes out clean. Makes approximately 22 muffins.

To make the icing, mix ½ cup softened butter with 4 ounces of cream cheese. Add a cup of powdered sugar and spread on the cupcakes. You can also sprinkle the cupcakes with coconut. If making a cake, top with coconut and press chopped walnuts onto the sides.

Banana Coconut Muffins
2 cups flour
½ tsp. baking soda
½ tsp salt
¾ cup white sugar
¼ cup packed brown sugar
¼ cup olive oil
2 mashed bananas
½ cup water
¼ cup flax
¼ cup wheat germ
¾ teaspoon
1 cup chopped pecans
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup coconut

Mix together dry ingredients and set aside; combine sugars, mix thoroughly and whisk in oil until you have a filigree mixture. Add bananas, very well mashed. Stir in dry ingredients, adding water. Mix in flax and wheat germ, and then add the vanilla. Next, put the nuts in, stirring occasionally, and lastly mix in the coconut. Top with coconut and granulated sugar. Finally, bake at 365 degrees for about 26 minutes.

6fruitmuff.jpgSix Fruit Muffins
2 cups flour
½ tsp. baking soda
½ tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
¾ cup white sugar
¼ cup brown sugar
¼ cup olive oil
2 ½ mashed bananas
½ cup water
½ cup ground flax seed
½ cup wheat germ
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup coconut
1 apple, peeled and chopped
1 pear, peeled and chopped
1 tsp fresh orange juice
⅓ cup chopped dried dates
½ cup chopped carrots

Mix together dry ingredients and set aside; combine sugars, mix thoroughly and whisk in oil until you have a filigree mixture. Add bananas, very well mashed. Stir in dry ingredients, adding water. Mix in flax and wheat germ, and then add the vanilla. Next, put the nuts in, stirring occasionally, and add the fruits. Top with coconut and granulated sugar. Finally, bake at 365 degrees for about 26 minutes.

California Condors: 9-foot Thunderbirds

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cndr.jpgCalifornia condors are remarkable birds. They have a nine-foot wingspan, the largest of any North American bird! They are so large that they are more often mistaken for airplanes than other birds. Due to their size, Native Americans called them "thunderbirds," because the sound of their wings flapping purportedly made thunder. They are mostly black, with white patches under the wings. Another myth, from the Chumash tribe, tells that condors once had white feathers, but were burned when they got too close to a fire.

The critically endangered condors are in the same family as vultures, and many vultures are scavengers, meaning that they eat the remnants of dead animals. Unlike some vultures, however, condors do not have a particularly good sense of smell, instead using their sharp eyes to find food. They do not have talons and cannot carry prey, so they eat 2-3 pounds of food at a sitting and then sit for a day to recover! They are so big that they intimidate most would-be competitors for food. Even bears ignore them, and golden eagles are the only species that will fight them. Dominant, older birds eat before the younger ones.

Condors mate for life. When a male spots a potential mate, his head turns bright red and he walks towards her with his wings spread. If she lowers her head, it means she accepts. Although no actual nest is built, they lay their eggs in hard-to-access caves in rocky cliffs. Incubation takes two months, with the parents taking turns sitting on the egg.

At one point, there were thousands of condors in the wild. Ten thousand years ago, they lived on both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts, from British Columbia to Baja California and from New York to Florida. However, they were endangered by many factors. They were hunted (particularly for museums) and poisoned by DDT. They got lead poisoning by scavenging dead animals killed by hunters who used lead bullets. Their habitat was also destroyed, and, as more people moved in, condor collisions with power lines increased. Additionally, people collected the condors' eggs. In the Gold Rush, condors were even turned into pets. The entire California condor population was reduced to 22 birds.

condorbaby3.jpgCaptive breeding programs saved the condors. In the wild, condors are slow breeders, but they "double-clutch," or lay a second egg if the first one is lost or taken. So scientists took the condors' first eggs, allowing the pairs to raise the second eggs. The first eggs were put in an incubator until they hatched, when the chicks were fed with condor puppets and recordings of condor sounds were played to them. In twenty years, the population grew to 200 birds.

Today there are 369 condors in the world, and 190 of these are wild. However, they are not safe. Some of them have been killed by coyotes or eagles. Some still flew into power lines, but now before new birds are released they "undergo a power pole aversion training program which uses mock power poles that deliver a small electric shock to the birds when they try to land on them," according to the US Fish & Wildlife Service. This has effectively stopped the collisions. They are also accidentally hunted, or are poisoned by chemicals. Lead poisoning from scavenged meat is still one of the biggest threats. Since reintroduction, 15 condors have died from lead poisoning. (Nine of the cases were proven, and six were recorded as very likely.) Recently, lead ammunition has been banned within the condors' range. Although some people refuse to comply with this law, it has reduced the risk. They have been reintroduced to parts of California, Arizona, and Utah. They are still very rare, but their populations are increasing. Captive breeding and careful conservation seem to have saved this magnificent raptor.

About this Archive

This page is a archive of recent entries written by Jaz Brisack in April 2011.

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