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Balanced Budget Amendment Introduced

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Ickes bandwagon.jpgOn April 8th of this year, H.J. Res. 48 was introduced by Congressman John Ratcliffe and referred to the House Judiciary Committee, officially introducing a proposed twenty-eighth amendment to the Constitution which would limit allocable federal funding to actual government revenue. This measure would effectively prohibit Congress from adding to our existing spending deficit of nearly $20 trillion dollars, curtailing the extravagant and extraneous expenditures currently rampant throughout federal agencies and departments. The amendment reads in full:

"1. Total outlays for any fiscal year shall not exceed total receipts for that fiscal year, unless two-thirds of the whole number of each House of Congress shall provide by law for a specific excess of outlays over receipts by a rollcall vote.
2. Total outlays for any fiscal year shall not exceed 18 percent of economic output of the United States, unless two-thirds of each House of Congress shall provide for a specific increase of outlays above this amount.
3. The limit on the debt of the United States held by the public shall not be increased unless three-fourths of the whole number of each House shall provide by law for such an increase by a rollcall vote.
4. Prior to each fiscal year, by not later than such date as Congress may by law require, the President shall transmit to Congress a proposed budget for the United States Government for that fiscal year in which total outlays do not exceed total receipts. If the President fails to transmit to Congress a proposed budget which meets the requirements of the previous sentence by the date required by Congress, the President may not receive any compensation for his services for any month which follows that date until the President transmits to Congress a proposed budget which meets such requirements.
5. For each fiscal year, by not later than such date as Congress may by law require, Congress shall consider and approve a budget for the United States Government which meets the requirements of section 4 of this article. If Congress fails to approve a budget which meets such requirements by the date required by Congress, Members of Congress may not receive any compensation for their services for any month which follows that date until Congress approves a budget which meets such requirements.
6. A bill to increase revenue shall not become law unless two-thirds of the whole number of each House shall provide by law for such an increase by a rollcall vote.
7. The Congress may waive the provisions of this article for any fiscal year in which a declaration of war is in effect. The provisions of this article may be waived for any fiscal year in which the United States is engaged in military conflict which causes an imminent and serious military threat to national security and is so declared by a joint resolution, adopted by a majority of the whole number of each House, which becomes law. Any such waiver must identify and be limited to the specific excess or increase for that fiscal year made necessary by the identified military conflict.
8. The Congress shall enforce and implement this article by appropriate legislation, which may rely on estimates of outlays and receipts.
9. A court may not enter an order in any action, including for purposes of enforcing this article, that results in an increase in the collection of revenue.
10. Total receipts shall include all receipts of the United States Government except those derived from borrowing. Total outlays shall include all outlays of the United States Government except for those for repayment of debt principal.
11. This article shall take effect beginning with the seventh fiscal year beginning after its ratification."


Harrison debt.jpgOver the past decades and centuries, those concerned with Washington's culture of wastefulness have repeatedly endeavored to enact similar legislation. When confronted with the massive deficits created by the Revolutionary War and subsequent inflation, Thomas Jefferson hoped that contemporary lawmakers would "render the immortal service of introducing this practice not that it is expected that Congress should formally declare such a principle. They wisely enough avoid deciding on abstract questions but they may be induced to keep themselves within its limits." In 1982, the Senate achieved the required two-thirds majority but the amendment was voted down in the House, and in 1995, it passed the House but failed to garner a single vote in the Senate. However, as our nation finds itself approximately $19,900,000,000,000 in debt and American citizens grow increasingly frustrated with the corruption and inefficiency of their government, any concerns about the effects of widespread budget cuts must give way to the imperative of ending our insouciant spending patterns. Perhaps the recognition that the present situation simply cannot continue will provide the impetus necessary to navigate the amendment through the Committee to the House and Senate floors and then the states, finally writing fiscal responsibility into our Constitution.

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