Results tagged “tariffs” from PlanetGreen.org

A New Tariff in Town? Not a Bad Idea

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Recently, opponents of President Trump's plan to construct a wall along the Mexican border and finance its construction with a protective tariff on Mexican imports have voiced a concern that this tariff will lead to increases in the prices of automobiles, groceries, and many other necessary goods. However, in their haste to criticize these proposals, they have overlooked several facts that make both the wall and the import tax a national imperative.

First, the argument that tariffs will raise the cost of living in America is based on the specious assumption that our manufacturing and agricultural requirements will continue to be outsourced at the same rate after these plans go into effect. This exhibits a fundamental misunderstanding of the purpose and practical impact of protectionist measures. Clearly, the border tax is designed not to penalize U.S. consumers but to reverse the rapid attrition of the national labor market. Furthermore, the slowing of international trade may actually reduce the cost of many food items, since domestic farmers will easily be able to meet our consumers' needs and American purchasers will no longer have to compete with Chinese and Mexican wholesalers willing to buy up U.S.-grown grain at exorbitant rates. The return of well-paying manufacturing jobs will also increase the availability of basic necessities by restoring employment to pre-NAFTA levels and creating real career paths for Americans currently stuck in the service sector due to the paucity of domestic jobs. For all of these reasons, the imposition of protective tariffs will boost the national economy.

Additionally, those criticizing these plans on the grounds that they are allegedly inimical to our democratic ideals are ignoring one of our most important national values: self-reliance and the willingness to prioritize our common interests over the convenience of luxury imports. Leading up to the American Revolution, our ancestors were prepared to sacrifice their own comfort as consumers in order to further the cause of our independence by boycotting British-made goods and products subject to arbitrary taxation. Nearly two and a half centuries later, it is hard to believe that our citizens have not inherited their devotion along with their achievements; that during the short period of economic transition that will follow the implementation of these proposals, we will not gladly invest in our collective prosperity and accept any temporary inconveniences caused by the preservation of American jobs.

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