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Say No to Imported Poisons

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Fourscore and thirty years ago, the Pure Food and Drug Act passed Congress and the first thorough regulations of food production, sales and labeling went into effect. This law was, in many ways, a lone beacon of liberalism in an age characterized by "liberty of contract" and other manifestations of corporate anarchy. A New York statute providing for a twelve-hour work day had been struck down just the year before. Corrupt legislatures had been allowed to openly grant monopolies in recent memory. Bans on unionizing were commonplace conditions of employment. Yet even a nation so apparently unconcerned with the welfare of its citizens realized that humans do have the right to be reassured that they are not consuming toxins or contaminants along with their daily meals.

Now, after all this time, the Trans-Pacific Partnership is poised to strike down all the progress we've made on this front. According to the office of the U.S. Trade Representative, the parties are merely agreeing "to cooperate to ensure that technical regulations and standards do not create unnecessary barriers to trade;" however, in reality, even the most basic requirements are now imperiled. Foreign exporters will have to state that their standards of purity and cleanliness are comparable to ours, but we will no longer have the authority to make them actually comply with our regulations. In addition, other provisions of the TPP weaken our country-of-origin legislation, rendering it practically impossible for consumers to find out what if any rules were followed in the making of a particular product.

For example, many of the eleven foreign states we are prepared to sign over our safety to rely on seafood exports as a crucial part of their economy. However, sea creatures are highly likely to ingest mercury and other runoff in both foreign and domestic waters, and fish from contaminated sources have been linked to birth defects, cognitive decline, cancer, and other serious and irreversible injuries. Under the TPP, alien companies would be allowed to import these fish without any significant restrictions or inspections, compelling U.S. regulators and consumers to take their word for it that they have followed procedures equivalent to our own.

Also, any standards the pact does not outright invalidate would still be subject to challenge as "illegal trade barriers," and taxpayers could be forced to hand over exorbitant damages to corporations which have no jurisdictional ties to the United States. Under NAFTA, for example, Canada was coerced into giving the Virginia-based Ethyl Corporation 13 million dollars in recompense and a statement that certain carcinogenic gasoline additives were not harmful after all. There is no reason to believe that our government will not be railroaded into these same forced confessions about hormones, pesticides, preservatives, and other substances currently banned or tightly regulated.

The proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership does not streamline safe and cooperative commerce; rather, it forces us to drink our glass down to the bottom and then reimburse corporate criminals for the cost of the poison they poured in it.

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